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The Roman Empire: Migration & Mobility

By Ray Laurence

Migration is the key challenge of the 21st century, but almost 2,000 years ago in the Roman Empire, migration rates were higher than those in Europe today. In this lecture, Professor Ray Laurence, Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the University of Kent, examines how the Roman Empire enabled the mobility of both the forces of the state and of its subjects.

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Ray Laurence

Ray Laurence is Professor of Ancient History at Macquarie University (Australia). Previous to his move to Macquarie University -- he was Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the University of Kent (UK). He has published prize-winning books on Pompeii: Roman Pompeii: Space and Society and Pompeii: The Living City. His work based in Archaeology, History and Classics is characterised by a cross-disciplinary aspect that causes it to be accessible and of wider interest to architects, landscape historians, geographers and urbanists. Of particular interest is his work on the relationship between the physical form of the Roman city and its residents. He has also published extensively on Roman roads and communications, childhood and ageing, quantitative approaches to Latin inscriptions and approaches to cultural change in the Roman Empire. In addition, he has written scripts for cartoons that can be found on TED.Ed that have attracted more than 11 million views on YouTube.