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Showcase: Excellence in UG Research @ Macquarie

By Departmental Research Seminar

Tuesday 7 Aug 2018 (Week2), 2-3.30pm

Recreation Room (S2.6), Level 3, Australian Hearing Hub, Macquarie University

The Department of Ancient History in conjunction with the Macquarie University Ancient History Association (MAHA) offers a research seminar series, intended to bring together those within Macquarie and outside who have an interest in the languages, histories, and cultures of the ancient world. View the schedule for the research seminar.

All are welcome! Please arrive on time and join us after the seminar for coffee, tea and biscuits!

Convenor: Dr Alexandra Woods Twitter



As part of the core unit in the Bachelor of Ancient History, AHIS350: Advanced Reading Unit in Ancient History, students undertake extended research on a topic arising from a previously completed Ancient History unit. Students formulate a research project and present their results at a unit mini-conference held at the end of session convened by Dr. Lea Beness.

The Department of Ancient History is delighted to provide a forum for the following outstanding AHIS350 students to gain valuable presentation experience, feedback from those in attendance and to further bolster their confidence in original research.

Paul Statheos

Words of Victory: Poetry and Archaism in the Song of Deborah

The unusual features of the Song of Deborah (Judges 5) have been recognised since antiquity. In addition to its poetic characteristics (an anomaly in the book of Judges), it displays a number of other linguistic oddities which have led it to be categorised as Archaic Biblical Hebrew – in fact, it has traditionally been labelled one of the oldest texts in the Hebrew Bible. It is also noteworthy for its emphasis on several prominent female characters: Deborah the prophetess-judge, Jael the peg-wielding tent-dweller, and the unnamed, unknowingly bereaved mother of Sisera. This paper focuses on identifying the distinctive linguistic and thematic features of the Song of Deborah, and assessing the grounds on which they have been described by commentators as ‘poetic’ or ‘archaic’.

Samuel Khouri

The Textual Links Between Ugaritic and Biblical Hebrew Poetry

TBA

Ewan Coopey

How Roman was the Roman Republican army?

The army of the Roman imperial period was as diverse as it was successful. Syrian archers served on Hadrian’s wall, and Germanic horsemen served in the African campaigns. Rome’s armies, however, were not always this diverse. This presentation offers a brief overview of the origins of Roman foreign troop usage, which took place between the last half of the 3rd century BC and the end of the 2nd century BC. Within this period the entirely Roman and Italian armies of the regal and early Republican periods transformed into the armies of the Late Republic, in which foreign troops featured heavily, with a plurality of functions. The presentation locates some of the first instances of Roman foreign troop usage, as well as exploring other features of their usage, such as the numbers they were deployed in, their ethnicities, and the means of procurement utilised by the Roman state. 

Madeline Jenkins

The Vocabulary of Violation: A Semantic Study of the ‘Tomb-Robbery Papyri’

The Tomb-Robbery Papyri refers to the corpus of hieratic administrative documents pertaining to the robberies in Thebes during the late Twentieth Dynasty. This interesting group of documents records the inspection of plundered properties and the interrogations, depositions and punishments of the ‘robbers.’ Accordingly, these texts preserve a plethora of terms denoting damage, despoilment and destruction. This research aims to explore the meaning of the selected vocabulary of violation from the Tomb-Robbery Papyri by employing an established semantic theory. This paper has employed O. Goldwasser’s analysis of graphemic classification and her ‘conceptual category’ thesis, as outlined in her publication, Prophets, Lovers and Giraffes: Wor(l)d Classification in Ancient Egypt, as the framework upon which the selected terms have been explored. Goldwasser suggests that the ‘determinatives’ in the Egyptian script form an elaborate system of ‘classifiers.’ She theorises that every word spanned by a specific classifier constitutes a ‘conceptual category,’ which accurately maps the knowledge-organisation of the Egyptian elite.

This paper will discuss three areas of insight that has been derived through the application of Goldwasser’s thesis on the selected terms, namely, an overview of the broad ‘conceptual categories’ in which the selected terms may be classified, the capacity of classifiers to paint a specific picture of meaning and the phenomenon of shifting ‘conceptual categories.’

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Departmental Research Seminar

The Department of Ancient History in conjunction with the Macquarie University Ancient History Association (MAHA) offers a research seminar series, intended to bring together those within Macquarie and outside who have an interest in the languages, histories, and cultures of the ancient world.