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Professor Antonis Kotsonas: The Materiality of Early Greek Inscriptions

By Departmental Research Seminar

Tuesday 14 Aug 2018 (Week 3), 2-3.30pm

17 Wally’s Walk Forum / former C5C Collaborative Forum. Please note the venue change for this week only.

The Department of Ancient History in conjunction with the Macquarie University Ancient History Association (MAHA) offers a research seminar series, intended to bring together those within Macquarie and outside who have an interest in the languages, histories, and cultures of the ancient world. View the schedule for the research seminar.

All are welcome! Please arrive on time and join us after the seminar for coffee, tea and biscuits!

Convenor: Dr Alexandra Woods Twitter


Antonis Kotsonas | Professor, University of Cincinnati

Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens 2018 Visiting Professor

  • The Materiality of Early Greek Inscriptions
  • The earliest inscriptions in the Greek alphabet date from the 8th and 7th centuries BCE and are particularly important for the understanding of Greek culture. These inscriptions have been studied extensively from an epigraphic and philological perspective centered on their text and meaning, and, more broadly, on the introduction of the Greek alphabet and its relation to the Phoenician alphabet, on orality and literacy in antiquity, and on the rise of the individual. Considerably less attention has been given to the archaeology of early Greek inscriptions and especially the material properties of the early Greek inscribed objects, which were largely clay vessels incised with a few words (so-called graffiti). Focusing on select assemblages of Greek inscribed ceramics of the 8th and 7th centuries BCE (from Mount Hymettus on Athens, Eretria on Euboea, Smyrna in Asia Minor, Methone in coastal Macedonia, Kommos on Crete, and Pithekoussai in the Bay of Naples), I explore the ways in which the inscribing of these vessels relates to their fabric, shape and decoration, and I evaluate the relevance of functional and cultural context to the epigraphic habit in the early Greek world.
  • When: Tuesday 14 Aug 2018 (Week 3), 2-3.30pm
  • Where: 17 Wally's Walk Forum / former C5C Collaborative Forum.

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Departmental Research Seminar

The Department of Ancient History in conjunction with the Macquarie University Ancient History Association (MAHA) offers a research seminar series, intended to bring together those within Macquarie and outside who have an interest in the languages, histories, and cultures of the ancient world.