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Dr Caleb Hamilton

By Departmental Research Seminar

Tuesday 21 May (Week 11), 2-3.30pm

Recreation Room (S2.6), Level 3, Australian Hearing Hub, Macquarie University

The Department of Ancient History in conjunction with the Macquarie University Ancient History Association (MAHA) offers a research seminar series, intended to bring together those within Macquarie and outside who have an interest in the languages, histories, and cultures of the ancient world. View the schedule for the research seminar.

All are welcome! Please arrive on time and join us after the seminar for coffee, tea and biscuits!

Convenor: Dr Alexandra Woods Twitter


Dr Caleb Hamilton | Monash University

Were the Early Dynastic Egyptians non-indigenous in Egypt? A unique case study in the Egyptian presence in the Western Desert

This current presentation engages with indigenous theory, and how this may present the Egyptians as non-indigenous to areas surrounding the Nile Valley during the Early Dynastic period. The use of an indigenous approach in Egyptology is not common, and it is acknowledged that through my lens as an indigenous NZ Māori, that engagement with this interdisciplinary field will further highlight the impact the Egyptians had on indigenous communities on a local scale during the Early Dynastic period, or how local communities and other cultures impacted Egyptian culture at this time.

Here I offer a definition of what ‘indigenous Egyptians ‘could be at this time, and the application of this through evidence from the Western Desert. This illuminates a different approach, attitude, and eventual permanent presence here. The evidence from this case study highlights how, initially, the Egyptians were foreigners in this region, with a drawn-out process of venturing towards, exploring and eventual annexation of this region into the nascent Egyptian state. I also show how the Egyptian non-indigenous presentation of, and approach to, this region was not in alignment with the prominent ideology of the period. Through this case study I will engage with the current available archaeological evidence, and an interpretation of this material culture through an existing understanding of Egyptian ideology of the time.

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